Aloe vera


Aloe vera

Plants Identity


Scientific Name

Aloe vera

Arabic name(s)

الصبار

English name(s)

Aloe

Order

Family

Genus

Species

Subspecies

Variety

Growth form

Plant

Plant’s Description

A short-stemmed succulent perennial herb of the LILIACEAE family, the succulent leaves are crowded on the top of their stems, spreading grayish green and glaucous; spotted when young, 20 to 50 cm long, 3 to 5 cm wide at the base, tapering gradually to the pointed tip, 1 to 2.5 cm thick; having spiny edges and bitter latex inside.

Ecology (Habitat)& distribution

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Geographic distribution

Plant’s Citations in the Holy Qur’an

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Other Citations for the plant in the Holy Qur’an

Other Citations for the plant in the Hadith

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Other Citations for the plant in the Hadith

History of the Plant


Stories about the plant in Holy Qur’an

Stories about the plant in Sunnah

The plant in the Arabic Literature

Etymology

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Functional Uses


Uses

Cosmetics

Products

Whole plant

Traditional Uses

Services

Landscape Services

Medicinal uses

Constituents (Chemical composition)

Side Effects

Other Uses

Cultivation (Agriculture)


Cultivation History

Cultivars and Varieties

Growth and propagation

September - October Soil requirements The aloe plant grows well in all types of soil. However, the loamy yellow soil, light, sandy, well-drainage is appropriate to it. The aloe resists and grows in high/low ranges of pH levels in soil. Temperature requirements Aloe grows in most of the globe; Aloe is lovely plant to the hot climate. Water requirements Water is not important for Aloe plants; it can resist the drought for many weeks. However, regular water as 1 liter per day for plant is very sufficient. Flowering Flowers are borne in cylindrical terminal racemes on central flower stalks, 5 to 100 cm high. The yellow perianth is divided into 6 lobes, about 2.5 cm long, with scattered bracts. Each flower has 6 protruding stamens and three-celled ovary with long style. Forms of the species vary in sizes of leaves and colors of flowers.

Tree management

• Germination: the seeds of Aloe vera plants produced commonly on March and April. Once the inflorescence comes to maturation, seeds start to be formed. It can be picked up and grown in sandy media soil, while then type of propagation is only used in the non-commercial types as breeding, while the aloe vera most common type of propagation is to divide the plant into several plants. • Transplanting: the plant after dividing can be grow in the propogation bag size 13 cm diameter, to a 2 month period of time, then it could be ready to transplant into the permanent field/orchard. • Pruning: not applicable • Supporting: not applicable. However, aloe should be protected in timings of winds from the heavy water supplied through reducing or stopping water. • Harvesting: the best time to harvest the aloe plants is after one year of cultivation, through cutting the mature leaves or the whole plants, then taken for extraction. • Yield: in the USA, it’s reported that mulch cultivation produce 18.0 tons per hectare while in the bare soil give 20.5 tons. In Jordon, it’s reported that the production per one hectare is from 8.0 – 16.0 tons

Pests and diseases

Harvesting & Yield

References

Aloe vera. (2016, July 24). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Aloe_vera&oldid=731336398 Aloe vera Response to Plastic Mulch and Nitrogen. (n.d.-a). Retrieved July 31, 2016, from https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/ncnu02/v5-570.html Aloe vera Response to Plastic Mulch and Nitrogen. (n.d.-b). Retrieved July 31, 2016, from https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/ncnu02/v5-570.html Lee, S. K. (2006). Overview of Aloe study. In Y. I. Park & S. K. Lee (Eds.), New Perspectives on Aloe (pp. 1–5). Springer US. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-34636-8_1 Piriformospora indica improves micropropagation, growth and phytochemical content of Aloe vera L. plants | SpringerLink. (n.d.). Retrieved July 31, 2016, from http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13199-014-0298-7 Ross, I. A. (2003a). Aloe vera. In Medicinal Plants of the World (pp. 103–131). Humana Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59259-365-1_4 Ross, I. A. (2003b). Aloe vera. In Medicinal Plants of the World (pp. 103–131). Humana Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59259-365-1_4 خدمة وزراعة الصبار - Google Search. (n.d.). Retrieved July 31, 2016, from https://www.google.com.qa/?gws_rd=ssl#q=%D8%AE%D8%AF%D9%85%D8%A9+%D9%88%D8%B2%D8%B1%D8%A7%D8%B9%D8%A9+%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B5%D8%A8%D8%A7%D8%B1&start=40